icarly-official:

matching icons for u and ur crew

celestial-sexhair:

bartimanus:

wontonpoop:

Pretty girls with long hair!! Stop cutting that shit off!! Boys don’t wanna date girls with boys haircuts!! Sorry!!

image

the gif though

aquaeverything:

baboy-19:

genkisbabe:

crewdlydrawn:

pemwin:

ladybowtheboo:

asobita-i:

Reblog for the last one

it’s a game show where everyone eats the furniture in a room and tries to see which is made of chocolate

So basically you’re telling me this is the best fucking game ever created

Forever reblog because of the door handle guy.

I love when Johnny’s go viral and the rest of the internet is just fascinated with them and I’m just like, yup those are my dorks lol

lol…

let this post hit a million please

euphorbic:

ang3lsh1:

lilmissaudwee92:

shoorm:

The East Asian women + colored hair trope
(An extension of extraextraex’s post.)
Looking at the pictures above, it’s pretty easy to find the similarities. East Asian women with dyed purple/blue/red hair, usually in a streak. No matter how you look at this, this is an uncomfortably specific trend in media. Yeah, it looks cute, but after seeing this over and over again, it becomes a boring, racist trope. This originated from a variety of possibilities: the creators trying to “Americanize” the East Asian character, make them more “exotic”, or to show how unique this character is. She’s not a giggling schoolgirl or a delicate lotus flower, she’s different! See, she has a streak of purple hair (god forbid she dyes it any other color), look how radical that is, look at our modern Dragon Lady!
And yes, Knives dyed her hair to look like Ramona, and yes, Somni-451’s hair is like that to mark her as a clone, but these characters do not exist in a vacuum. You can justify why a character has a specific appearance, but in the end, this character was created, and contributes to stereotypes no matter the intent.
So the moral of this story is that your Asian character with a strip of purple hair isn’t original. It isn’t unique. No matter how innocent this appears to be, it can be detrimental to East Asian girls, since the characters that look like them have the same exact traits. It’s time to explore different ways of designing East Asian characters, instead of just slapping on some purple and calling it a day.

wow i did not notice this until it got pointed out.

As a typical South East Asian, currently living in South East Asia, you can go on and on about this being a stereotypical Asian trait or whatever, but you know what? I would dye my hair this way if I weren’t a working professional because, you know what? I actually like that style. I like having random highlights because it looks cool. And I have seen most of the teenagers with outrageous colours: blue, red, purples, even rainbow colours because it’s a way to stand out among the sea of black hair. So stop trying to find every single little detail to nitpick and show that wow, you get it and you’re standing up for SJ over something that’s actually a common appearance in, Surprise! South East Asia.

You know, let’s be real here; this is bullshit. Once upon a time SJ was actually a really awesome thing and when done properly it can still be a powerful tool. The problem is all the wannabe allies trying to show how conscientious they are of SJ problems when all they really want is a pat on the back.
However, you don’t get a pat on the back for undermining what was once an excellent method of change. You aren’t an ally when you make these sort of claims, because what you have done and continue to do is destroy the credibility of SJ. I see far more bitching about SJ on my dash than I should and this post (and it’s cited predecessor) is a particularly good example of the sort of bullshit claims that drive rejection of SJ. (Though, admittedly, this one is laughably transparent.)
As an aside; here in Japan and over in Korea it isn’t uncommon to see girls with colorful highlights or lowlights. It isn’t uncommon to see girls with colorful highlights in movies, television, anime, games, or PMVs here, either. And since western cartoons were referenced, maybe watch some anime.
So if you’re bothered by that trope and you want to put a stop to it, perhaps your first stop should be Asia.
If you really want to use SJ for Asian women, there are very real issues that Japanese-American women have to deal with on a daily basis. For example, OP includes an Asian prostitute from Skyfall. Why are we worried about hair when the Asian Prostitute stereotype is sitting right there? How could you go off about hair when something far less shallow and far more insidious is going on? 
Nikki Wong is included even though she is a character that questions authority which breaks the Submissive Asian stereotype.
Yukio from The Wolverine is a hot mess of stereotypes in her source material (in the comics she was a ninja), but no, we’ll talk about her hair.
Akima Kunimoto was actually one of the main characters and a pilot that didn’t take shit. She breaks stereotypes.
Knives Chau is included because half her hair is blue, but all of the white female lead’s hair is purple. It’s appropriate. However, Knives is problematic as a Submissive Asian for Scott Pilgrim. She exists as a male fantasy; an Asian woman that is obsessed with him.
I’m going to end this with Mako Mori. She’s a Japanese woman that is respectful rather than submissive, isn’t a love interest, and is informed by her Asian-ness rather than defined by it. Hell, she even has her own narrative arc.
TL;DR
If colorful highlights in Asian characters’ hair is a trope it is one fully embraced by many Asian countries. 
Social Justice is undermined by claims like that in point 1.
The original posts lost an opportunity to address damaging stereotypes Asian women really do face.

euphorbic:

ang3lsh1:

lilmissaudwee92:

shoorm:

The East Asian women + colored hair trope

(An extension of extraextraex’s post.)

Looking at the pictures above, it’s pretty easy to find the similarities. East Asian women with dyed purple/blue/red hair, usually in a streak. No matter how you look at this, this is an uncomfortably specific trend in media. Yeah, it looks cute, but after seeing this over and over again, it becomes a boring, racist trope. This originated from a variety of possibilities: the creators trying to “Americanize” the East Asian character, make them more “exotic”, or to show how unique this character is. She’s not a giggling schoolgirl or a delicate lotus flower, she’s different! See, she has a streak of purple hair (god forbid she dyes it any other color), look how radical that is, look at our modern Dragon Lady!

And yes, Knives dyed her hair to look like Ramona, and yes, Somni-451’s hair is like that to mark her as a clone, but these characters do not exist in a vacuum. You can justify why a character has a specific appearance, but in the end, this character was created, and contributes to stereotypes no matter the intent.

So the moral of this story is that your Asian character with a strip of purple hair isn’t original. It isn’t unique. No matter how innocent this appears to be, it can be detrimental to East Asian girls, since the characters that look like them have the same exact traits. It’s time to explore different ways of designing East Asian characters, instead of just slapping on some purple and calling it a day.

wow i did not notice this until it got pointed out.

As a typical South East Asian, currently living in South East Asia, you can go on and on about this being a stereotypical Asian trait or whatever, but you know what? I would dye my hair this way if I weren’t a working professional because, you know what? I actually like that style. I like having random highlights because it looks cool. And I have seen most of the teenagers with outrageous colours: blue, red, purples, even rainbow colours because it’s a way to stand out among the sea of black hair. So stop trying to find every single little detail to nitpick and show that wow, you get it and you’re standing up for SJ over something that’s actually a common appearance in, Surprise! South East Asia.

You know, let’s be real here; this is bullshit. Once upon a time SJ was actually a really awesome thing and when done properly it can still be a powerful tool. The problem is all the wannabe allies trying to show how conscientious they are of SJ problems when all they really want is a pat on the back.

However, you don’t get a pat on the back for undermining what was once an excellent method of change. You aren’t an ally when you make these sort of claims, because what you have done and continue to do is destroy the credibility of SJ. I see far more bitching about SJ on my dash than I should and this post (and it’s cited predecessor) is a particularly good example of the sort of bullshit claims that drive rejection of SJ. (Though, admittedly, this one is laughably transparent.)

As an aside; here in Japan and over in Korea it isn’t uncommon to see girls with colorful highlights or lowlights. It isn’t uncommon to see girls with colorful highlights in movies, television, anime, games, or PMVs here, either. And since western cartoons were referenced, maybe watch some anime.

So if you’re bothered by that trope and you want to put a stop to it, perhaps your first stop should be Asia.

If you really want to use SJ for Asian women, there are very real issues that Japanese-American women have to deal with on a daily basis. For example, OP includes an Asian prostitute from Skyfall. Why are we worried about hair when the Asian Prostitute stereotype is sitting right there? How could you go off about hair when something far less shallow and far more insidious is going on? 

Nikki Wong is included even though she is a character that questions authority which breaks the Submissive Asian stereotype.

Yukio from The Wolverine is a hot mess of stereotypes in her source material (in the comics she was a ninja), but no, we’ll talk about her hair.

Akima Kunimoto was actually one of the main characters and a pilot that didn’t take shit. She breaks stereotypes.

Knives Chau is included because half her hair is blue, but all of the white female lead’s hair is purple. It’s appropriate. However, Knives is problematic as a Submissive Asian for Scott Pilgrim. She exists as a male fantasy; an Asian woman that is obsessed with him.

I’m going to end this with Mako Mori. She’s a Japanese woman that is respectful rather than submissive, isn’t a love interest, and is informed by her Asian-ness rather than defined by it. Hell, she even has her own narrative arc.

TL;DR

  1. If colorful highlights in Asian characters’ hair is a trope it is one fully embraced by many Asian countries. 
  2. Social Justice is undermined by claims like that in point 1.
  3. The original posts lost an opportunity to address damaging stereotypes Asian women really do face.

*high fives your ass*

bakrua:

breelandwalker:

NORWEGIAN

FOREST

CATS

VIKING

KITTAHS

Warrior cats

ichthyologee:

this is too real

ichthyologee:

this is too real

charliesabadassbury:

just in time for the skeleton war

charliesabadassbury:

just in time for the skeleton war

mrrandomneseianese:

Guys can we talk about how great reversed gifs are

image

like we have the vacuums

image

we have the dirty stuff

image

image

we have the fixers

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we have the ceptioners

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and we have my favorite 

image

like these are the greatest things in the world

waitrose:

hand writing at the start of an exam

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hand writing at the end of an exam

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scrapes:

prettynaturally:

yung-obama:

"nicki minaj had so much face surgery"

image

image

image

Thank you 🌞

SHE JUST GOT GOOD MAKEUP ARTISTS HAG ASS HATERS

twospookywhiskey:

bleachdalilah:

thtwhitegurrl:

slutdust:

I bought my friend an elephant for their room.

They said “Thank you.”

I said “Don’t mention it.”

Is there a joke here that 15 thousand people get but I don’t?

PLEASE EXPLAIN

EHEHEH

decayingdean:

how is he doing this

singwithme2397:

the horror and concentration on his face

yes my music is good